Module Courses

  • The courses listed below are ones that Cognitive Systems has determined are relevant to COGS students. In some cases a student may still need to get permission from the course instructor to take the course.
  • Modules must be 3rd and 4th year courses.
  • Check the number of module credits your stream requires on the Degree Requirements page. Note that you are required to complete a certain number of module credits within your home department as well as outside your home department.
  • Not every course is available every term! Always make sure to check its availability to see if it is offered when needed.
  • When in doubt – contact the Program Coordinator at cogs.advising@ubc.ca
 Department  Course  Course Description
Anthropology

ANTH 417B
Language, Culture, and Cognition

The relationships between linguistic and cultural phenomena; how language affects normative and cognitive systems of thought and behaviour.

 Pre-reqs: One of ANTH 100, LING 200. (May be taken as co-requisites.)
Asia

ASIA 371
Foundations of Chinese Thought

Chinese thought from its beginnings until the Han dynasty (206 BCE to 220 CE) in its historical and cultural contexts. Includes, among others: Confucius; Mo Zi; the Legalists/Authoritarians; Zhuang Zi; the Lao Zi book.  Equivalents: PHIL 371

ASIA 378
Philosophical Wisdom of Early India

Epistemological and ontological thought from the Vedic period to the period of the rise of philosophical schools or systems Philosophy in the Mahabharata, Gita; early Buddhist and Jain views on knowledge and reality; views on language.  Equivalents: PHIL 378
Audiology & Speech Sciences AUDI 402
Neuroanatomy for Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology

An overview of neuroanatomy and functional neuroanatomy with emphasis on neuroanatomy related to hearing and speech mechanisms.

 This course is offered online twice a year, beginning in January and May. Please note that this course may require prerequisite course content.
AUDI 403
Introduction to Neurolinguistics

Addresses historical and current issues in studying the neuroanatomical substrates associated with language processing, including brain imaging, localization, and lateralization of language functions.

 This course is offered online each year, beginning in March. Please note, this course may require prerequisite course content.

1.5 Credits only

Biology

BIOL 361
Physiology of Sensory, Nervous and Muscular Systems

Excitable membranes, neural signaling and transmission; transduction and coding of sensory information; muscle contraction.

 Pre-reqs: BIOL 200. (One of BIOL 260 or BIOL 201 recommended.)

BIOL 459
Neurobiology of Sensory and Motor Systems

Analysis of the mechanisms of sensory processing and motor orchestration using vertebrate and invertebrate model systems. Neural circuit structure, specialization, information coding, integration, and behaviour.

 Pre-reqs: BIOL 455.
BIOL 455*
Comparative Neurobiology

Current approaches in neurobiology, from the cellular to the behavioural level, are examined using representatives of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems.

BIOL 455 may be counted as a module as long as PSYC 360 or PSYC 304 have not been taken.

 BIOL 458*
Developmental Neurobiology

Cellular, molecular and physiological aspects of nervous system development with applications to understanding adult nervous system function and neurological disorders.

BIOL 458 may be as a module course as long as PSYC 360 or PSYC 304 have not been taken.

Biomedical Engineering BMEG 410
Biomedical Equipment, Physiology, and Anatomy

Principles and operation of biomedical equipment for cardiovascular system, respiratory system, renal dialysis, endoscopy, surgery, and imaging. Functional relationships of biomedical equipment to physiology and anatomy of major body systems.

Restricted to students in EECE and MECH Biomedical Engineering options. Credit is given for one of BMEG 410 or 530.

BMEG 456
Clinical and Industrial Biomedical Engineering

Principles of clinical practice, Canadian healthcare system, medical approach to diagnosis, ethics and regulations for clinical trials, medical technology management, medical device development and standards, biostatistics.

 Restricted to students in EECE and MECH Biomedical Engineering options. Credit will be granted for only one of APSC 456, APSC 556, BMEG 456, or BMEG 556.
Chemical & Biological Engineering CHBE 356
Process Dynamics and Control

Introduction to modeling of chemical processes; transient response analysis; design of feedback control systems; stability analysis; frequency response analysis; process control applications; instrumentation; advanced control techniques; distributed control systems.

Computer Science  CPSC 304
Introduction to Relational Databases
Overview of database systems, ER models, logical database design and normalization, formal relational query languages, SQL and other commercial languages, data warehouses, special topics  Prerequisites: Either (a) CPSC 221; or (b)CPSC 260, EECE 320 and one of CPSC 210, EECE 210, EECE 309.
 CPSC 310
Introduction to Software Engineering

Specification, design, implementation and maintenance of large, multi-module software systems. Principles, techniques, methodologies and tools for computer aided software engineering (CASE); human-computer interfaces, reactive systems, hardware-software interfaces and distributed applications.

 Prerequisite

  1. CPSC 210 (Note, CPSC 211 is also an acceptable pre-req although the SSC may display a warning. Please email undergrad-info AT cs DOT ubc DOT ca if you’re having trouble registering.)
CPSC 311
Definition of Programming Languages

Comparative study of advanced programming language features. Statement types, data types, variable binding, parameter passing mechanisms. Methods for syntactic and semantic description of programming languages.

 Pre-reqs: CPSC 210.
CPSC 312
Functional and Logic Programming

Principles of symbolic computing, using languages based upon first-order logic and the lambda calculus. Algorithms for implementing such languages. Applications to artificial intelligence and knowledge representation.

 Pre-reqs: One of CPSC 210, EECE 210, EECE 309, CPEN 221.
CPSC 313
Computer Hardware and Operating Systems

Instruction sets, pipelining, code optimization, caching, virtual memory management, dynamically linked libraries, exception processing, execution time of programs.

 Pre-reqs: Either (a) all of CPSC 213, CPSC 221 or (b) all of CPSC 210, CPSC 213, CPSC 260, EECE 320.
CPSC 314
Computer Graphics

Human vision and colour; geometric transformations; algorithms for 2-D and 3-D graphics; hardware and system architectures; shading and lighting; animation. (Consult the Credit Exclusion list within the Faculty of Science section of the Calendar.)

 Pre-reqs: One of MATH 200, MATH 253 and one of MATH 152, MATH 221, MATH 223 and either (a) CPSC 221 or (b) all of CPSC 260, EECE 320.
CPSC 317
Internet Computing

Computer networking, basic communication protocols, network infrastructure and routing. Common application-level protocols and principles associated with developing distributed applications.

 Pre-reqs: CPSC 213 and either (a) CPSC 221 or (b) all of CPSC 210, CPSC 260, EECE 320.
CPSC 319
Software Engineering Project

The design, implementation, and test of a large software system, using a team approach.

 Pre-reqs: CPSC 310.
CPSC 320
Intermediate Algorithm Design and Analysis

Systematic study of basic concepts and techniques in the design and analysis of algorithms, illustrated from various problem areas. Topics include: models of computation; choice of data structures; graph-theoretic, algebraic, and text processing algorithms.

 Pre-reqs: Either (a) CPSC 221 or (b) all of CPSC 260, EECE 320. (In addition to above pre-requisites: either (a) 6 credits of 2nd Yr. MATH or STAT or (b) 3 credits of 2nd Yr. MATH or STAT with a grade of 72% or better.)
CPSC 322
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Problem-solving and planning; state/action models and graph searching. Natural language understanding Computational vision. Applications of artificial intelligence.

 Pre-reqs: Either (a) CPSC 221 or (b) all of CPSC 260, EECE 320 and one of CPSC 210, EECE 210, EECE 309.
CPSC 340
Machine Learning and Data Mining
Models of algorithms for dimensionality reduction, nonlinear regression, classification, clustering and unsupervised learning; applications to computer graphics, computer games, bio-informatics, information retrieval, e-commerce, databases, computer vision and artificial intelligence.  Pre-reqs: One of MATH 152, MATH 221, MATH 223 and one of STAT 200, STAT 203, STAT 241, STAT 251, MATH 302, STAT 302, MATH 318, BIOL 300; and either (a) CPSC 221 or (b) all of CPSC 260, EECE 320 and one of CPSC 210, EECE 210, EECE 309.
CPSC 344
Introduction to Human Computer Interaction Methods

Basic tools and techniques, teaching a systematic approach to interface design, task analysis, analytic and empirical evaluation methods.

 Pre-reqs: One of CPSC 210, EECE 210, EECE 309, CPEN 221.
CPSC 404
Advanced Relational Databases

Specification, design, construction and validation of multi-version software systems.

 Pre-reqs: Either (a) CPSC 310 or (b) one of EECE 310, CPEN 321 and one of EECE 315, CPEN 331.
CPSC 416
Distributed Systems

Concepts and design of distributed systems. Communication architecture and models for interprocess communication. Process migration, naming, distributed file systems, fault tolerance, and concurrency control.

 Pre-reqs: One of CPSC 313, EECE 315, CPEN 331 and one of CPSC 317, EECE 358, ELEC 331.
CPSC 420
Advanced Algorithms Design and Analysis

The study of advanced topics in the design and analysis of algorithms and associated data structures. Topics include algorithms for graph-theoretic; algebraic and geometric problems; algorithms on nonsequential models; complexity issues; approximation algorithms.

 Pre-reqs: CPSC 320.
CPSC 421
Introduction to Theory of Computing

Characterizations of computability (using machines, languages and functions). Universality, equivalence and Church’s thesis. Unsolvable problems. Restricted models of computation. Finite automata, grammars and formal languages.

 Pre-reqs: Either (a) CPSC 221 or (b) all of CPSC 260, EECE 320. (CPSC 320 is recommended.)
CPSC 422
Intelligent Systems

Principles and techniques underlying the design, implementation and evaluation of intelligent computational systems. Applications of artificial intelligence to natural language understanding, image understanding and computer-based expert and advisor systems. Advanced symbolic programming methodology.

 Pre-reqs: All of CPSC 312, CPSC 322.
CPSC 425
Computer Vision

Introduction to the processing and interpretation of images. Image sensing, sampling, and filtering. Algorithms for colour analysis, texture description, stereo imaging, motion interpretation, 3D shape recovery, and recognition.

 Pre-reqs: All of MATH 200, MATH 221 and either (a) CPSC 221 or (b) all of CPSC 260, EECE 320.
CPSC 430
Computers and Society

Impact of computer technology on society; historical perspectives; social and economic consequences of large-scale information processing systems and automatic control; legal and ethical problems in computer applications. Computers and the individual: machine versus human capabilities, fact and fancy; problematic interface between man and machine.

 Pre-reqs: (3 credits of Computer Science and at least third-year standing.)
CPSC 444
Advanced Methods for Human Computer Interaction

Design and evaluation methodologies and theories; formal models of the user including visual, motor, and information processing; advanced evaluation methods including laboratory experiments and field studies; HCI research frontiers.

 Pre-reqs: All of CPSC 310, CPSC 344 and one of STAT 200, STAT 241.
CPSC 445
Algorithms in Bioinformatics

Sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree reconstruction, prediction of RNA and protein structure, gene finding and sequence annotation, gene expression, and biomolecular computing.

 Pre-reqs: CPSC 320. (and six credits of BIOL beyond BIOL 111.)
Linguistics  LING 300 Introduction to syntactic analysis and theory, with emphasis on description and analysis of data from a wide variety of languages.  Pre-reqs: LING 201.
 LING 311 Introduction to phonological analysis and theory, with a strong emphasis on description and analysis of data from a wide variety of languages.  Prerequisite: LING 200.
 LING 313 The articulatory and acoustic properties of speech production and perception, including practice in phonetic transcription, instrumental recording, and the analysis of normal speech.  Prerequisite: LING 200. Recommended: All of LING 100, PSYC 100 (or PSYC 101 and 102), PSYC 217 and 218, PHYS 341.
 LING 314 Physiological and/or acoustic phonetics. Focus on experimental methods and analysis techniques. Topics may include: source-filter theory; spectral and temporal acoustic analysis, inter-articulator timing and motor coordination.  Prerequisite: LING 313. Recommended: All of LING 100, PSYC 100 (or PSYC 101 and 102), PSYC 217 and 218, PHYS 341.
 LING 319 The historical study of language. Linguistic change. Language families and evidence for genetic relationship. Comparative method and internal reconstruction. Emphasis on phonological and morphological reconstruction. Not offered every year.  Prerequisite: All of LING 200, LING 201.
 LING 327 The analysis and theory of linguistic meaning with emphasis on formal techniques for semantic analysis and their application to empirical phenomena in language, including pragmatics.  Prerequisite: LING 201.
 LING 345 Selected topics in pragmatics and information structure, including variations in their cross-linguistic expression and the corresponding influence of sentence form on context.  Prerequisite: One of LING 201, ENGL 331, PHIL 220.
 LING 431 Elicitation, transcription, organization, and analysis of linguistic data from a native speaker of a language not commonly studied. Practical experience in the use of fieldwork equipment.  Prerequisite: All of LING 300, LING 311.
 LING 432 Elicitation, transcription, organization, and analysis of linguistic data from a native speaker of a language not commonly studied. Practical experience in the use of fieldwork equipment.  Prerequisite: LING 431.
 LING 447 A capstone course for Linguistics and Speech Sciences majors, normally taken after three years of study. Individual sections will differ substantially; see online Course List for detailed descriptions and prerequisites. May be repeated for credit when content is different.
 LING 451 Development of the phonological system in typical first language acquisition from the perspective of diverse linguistic topics. Phonetic transcription of child speech.  Prerequisite: All of LING 222, LING 311.
 LING 452 Central issues in the first language acquisition of syntax, including early lexical and semantic development, acquisition of morphology, and syntactic development (e.g., word order, questions).  Prerequisite: All of LING 222, LING 300.
Math

MATH 302
Introduction to Probability

Basic notions of probability, random variables, expectation and conditional expectation, limit theorems.

 Pre-reqs: One of MATH 200, MATH 217, MATH 226, MATH 253, MATH 263.

Equivalents: STAT 302

Mechanical Engineering

MECH 421
Mechatronics

Architecture of mechatronics devices; integration of mechanical, electronics, sensors, actuators, computer and real time software systems; PLC and PC based systems; discrete and continuous automation system design.

 Pre-reqs: MECH 366.Co-reqs: MECH 420.
Microbiology

MICB 405 Bioinformatics

Computational methods to analyze genome and protein sequences to derive structural and functional information. Related topics in functional genomics.

 Pre-reqs: One of MICB 301, MICB 325, BIOC 302, BIOC 303, BIOL 335, BIOT 380.
Music

MUSC 320
Computer Music

The study of computer applications to music, focusing on digital synthesis techniques and languages, methods of algorithmic composition, and the design of music editors.

 Pre-reqs: MUSC 319. (or permission of instructor.)

MUSC 415
Imagining Musical Performances

How performance and analysis engage the musical imagination, as complementary activities; how analytical observations can stimulate performance, and vice versa. Selected topics, with special emphasis on temporal factors.

 Pre-reqs: One of MUSC 201, MUSC 210.
Philosophy

PHIL 320

Symbolic Logic 2

Continuation of PHIL 220. A system of deduction for predicate logic is selected for further study. Completeness of this system and other metatheoretic results are proved. Other topics include computability, recursive function theory, incompleteness and decidability. Pre-reqs: PHIL 220.

PHIL 321

Induction and Decision

Formal methods relevant to the logic of decision. Decision theory, game theory, axiomatic probability theory and its interpretations, belief dynamics, simulation and modelling. Pre-reqs: One of PHIL 125, PHIL 220.
PHIL 340
Knowledge and Reality
 Topics in metaphysics and epistemology such as induction, the mind/body problem, free will, and action theory. Readings from classic and contemporary texts.  Pre-reqs: PHIL 240.
PHIL 326
Philosophy of Language
Philosophical discussion of language, meaning, and communication.  Pre-reqs: (Philosophy or linguistics courses totaling 9 credits at the 200-level or above.)Students require PHIL or LING courses totalling 9 credits at the 200 level or above.
PHIL 333
Biomedical Ethics
Moral problems arising in the health sciences, especially in medicine but also in biology, psychology, and social work. Topics include abortion, death and euthanasia, genetic engineering, behaviour modification, compulsory treatment, experimentation with human beings and animals, and the relationship between professionals and their patients, subjects or clients. No philosophical background is required.
PHIL 441A
Philosophy of Perception
The contribution of the senses to knowledge of the external world; the nature of perception and its contribution to empirical knowledge. Pre-reqs: PHIL 240. (or COGS 200 if accompanied by 3 credits in PHIL at the 200-level or above.)Students require COGS 200 and 3 credits of PHIL at the 200 level or above; or pre-requisite.
PHIL 450A
Metaphysics
Topics including ontology, universals and particulars, substance, determinism and indeterminism, identity over time, and theories of truth.

 Pre-reqs: (9 credits in PHIL at the 200-level or above.)Students require 9 credits in PHIL at the 200 level or above.

Note this is NOT offered every term.

PHIL 455A Topics in the Philosophy of Cognitive Science Philosophical topics in the cognitive sciences, such as empiricism vs. nativism, consciousness, mental representation, cognitive architecture, language and thought, and situated cognition. Pre-reqs: PHIL 240. (or COGS 200 if accompanied by 3 credits in PHIL at the 200-level or above. Recommended: PHIL 441 or PHIL 451.)
PHIL 369
Philosophy of Science
Issues common to all sciences. Philosophical questions including the character of scientific laws, theories and revolutions, the nature of scientific confirmation, causality, explanation and prediction, and the use of logic and probability. Difficulties in the interpretation of atomic physics and questions about relationships between biology and psychology. No philosophical background is assumed.
Psychology  PSYC 304 The neurobiological bases of behaviour; brain processes involved in perception, motivation, emotion, psychopathology, learning and memory. Open to all Arts and Science majors except those in the B.Sc. Psychology program. Credit will not be given for both PSYC 304 and PSYC 360.  Pre-reqs: Either (a) PSYC 100 or (b) all of PSYC 101, PSYC 102 or (c) two of PSYC 207, PSYC 208, PSYC 217, PSYC 218 or (d) PSYC 260.This course is restricted to students in year: >=2 -OR-
in one of these faculties: GRAD
 PSYC 309 Contribution of cognitive processes to perception, attention, and memory; cognitive development, language, thinking, and creativity.  Pre-reqs: Either (a) PSYC 100 or (b) all of PSYC 101, PSYC 102. (Or (c) 6 credits of 200-level Psychology (but not 205 or 263).) This course is restricted to students in year: >=2 -OR-
in one of these faculties: GRAD -OR-
in one of these categories: Qualifying -OR-
in one of these categories: UNCL
 PSYC 333 Classical and contemporary metaphors for memory and their impact on theory development.  Pre-reqs: Either (a) PSYC 100 or (b) all of PSYC 101, PSYC 102. (or (c) 6 credits of 200-level Psychology (but not 205 or 263). Non-PSYC students may substitute LING 460 or LING 200 and 201 for the above prerequisite.)This course is restricted to students in year: >=3 -OR-
in one of these faculties: GRAD
PSYC 336 Psychological abilities underlying human language; language processing, lexical representation, and principles of online conversation; animal versus human communication.  Pre-reqs: Either (a) PSYC 100 or (b) all of PSYC 101, PSYC 102. (Non-PSYC students may substitute ENGL 329, or LING 420, or LING 200 and 201 for the above prerequisite.)This course is restricted to students in year: >=3
PSYC 359 Prepares students for graduate studies or other advanced behavioural research; experimental design and analytic techniques; laboratory with computer applications.  Pre-reqs: Either (a) all of PSYC 217, PSYC 218 or (b) PSYC 366.This course is restricted to students in year: >2
PSYC 360 The relationship between the nervous system and behaviour; the physiological basis of perception, motivation, learning, and memory. Please consult the Faculty of Science Credit  Pre-reqs: PSYC 260.This course is restricted to students in year: >=3 -OR-
not in any of these faculties: ARTS not with any of these specializations: MAJ ****
PSYC 366
Methods in Research
Detailed coverage of basic research methods; the design of experiments and statistical analysis; methods will be applied in laboratory and project work.  Pre-reqs: PSYC 260. (or in Honours program.)This course is restricted to students in one of these programs: BSC in year: >=2 with one of these specializations: ****PSYC -OR-
in one of these programs: BA in year: >=3 with one of these specializations: HON PSYC
PSYC 367
Sensory Systems
Anatomy and physiology of the sensory pathways and their relation to perception.  Pre-reqs: Either (a) PSYC 100 or (b) all of PSYC 101, PSYC 102. (or (c) 6 credits of 200-level Psychology (but not 205 or 263).)This course is restricted to students in year: >=3 -OR-
in one of these faculties: GRAD -OR-
in one of these categories: Qualifying -OR-
in one of these categories: UNCL
PSYC 368
Perceptual Processing
Perceptual phenomena and their underlying brain mechanisms.  Pre-reqs: PSYC 367.This course is restricted to students in year: >=3 -OR-
in one of these faculties: GRAD -OR-
in one of these categories: Qualifying -OR-
not in any of these categories: UNCL
PSYC 460
Behavioural Neuroendocrinology
Detailed examination of the interaction between hormones and neural control of reproductive and non-reproductive behaviours; emphasis on gonadal and adrenal hormone effects on learning and memory in the brain.  Pre-reqs: One of PSYC 304, PSYC 360.This course is restricted to students in one of these programs: BA in year: >=4 -OR-
in one of these programs: BSC in year: >=4 -OR-
in year: =5
PSYC 461 Neuroplasticity and Behaviour Experimental findings and theory documenting the plasticity of the brain and its relationship to behaviour: emphasis on gene regulation, neurogenesis and cell morphology changes in relation to learning and experience.  Pre-reqs: One of PSYC 304, PSYC 360, PSYC 460.This course is restricted to students in one of these programs: BA in year: >=4 -OR-
in one of these programs: BSC in year: >=4 -OR-
in year: =5
PSYC 462
Drugs and Behavioural Neuroscience
Introduction to neurochemical systems and functional neuroanatomy; animal models of human cognitive processes and mental disorders; neurochemical foundations and treatments for mental disorders. BIOL 205 and/or PCTH 325 recommended.  Pre-reqs: One of PSYC 304, PSYC 360.This course is restricted to students in year: >=3
PSYC 337
The Psychology of Language
Language and thought; deriving psychological principles from language universals; the psychology of literacy, dyslexia, multilingualism, and natural language processing.
Prerequisite: PSYC 336 or permission of the instructor.
Note that this is NOT offered every term.
PSYC 465
Computers in Psychology
Applications of computers unique to psychology. Microcomputer programming experience desirable but not necessary: students can learn this early in the course.
Note that this is NOT offered every term.